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Indian Spring Hollyhock | In The Garden: ‘Indian Spring’ Hollyhock – Ornamental Cut Flower Gardening 상위 114개 답변

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#Gardening #GrowingFlowers #Hollyhocks
In this video, we’ll take a look at the variety of hollyhock that I have growing in my garden this year called ‘Indian Spring’. Make sure to always do your research and handle hollyhocks safely.
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Many ornamental flowers and cut flowers are TOXIC. ALWAYS do your own research and take responsibility for the plants that you introduce around your kids, pets, and everyone else. Use common sense when handling plant materials: wear gloves, always wash hands, avoid contact with face, etc. NEVER consume any plant which you have not positively identified with complete certainty to be safe and edible. Before planting anything, research to determine whether specific flowers are considered invasive where you live or if there are laws that apply to their planting in your area.
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How to Grow Indian Spring Hollyhocks From Seed

For striking garden backgrounds, few plants compare to “Indian Spring” hollyhocks (Alcea rosea “Indian Spring”). These perennials grow to more than 5 feet, …

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Source: homeguides.sfgate.com

Date Published: 4/25/2021

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주제와 관련된 더 많은 사진을 참조하십시오 In the Garden: ‘Indian Spring’ Hollyhock – Ornamental Cut Flower Gardening. 댓글에서 더 많은 관련 이미지를 보거나 필요한 경우 더 많은 관련 기사를 볼 수 있습니다.

In the Garden: 'Indian Spring' Hollyhock - Ornamental Cut Flower Gardening
In the Garden: ‘Indian Spring’ Hollyhock – Ornamental Cut Flower Gardening

주제에 대한 기사 평가 indian spring hollyhock

  • Author: BACKYARD BLOOMS: FRESHCUTKY – FRESH CUT FLOWERS🌻
  • Views: 조회수 2,591회
  • Likes: 좋아요 30개
  • Date Published: 2016. 6. 20.
  • Video Url link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukHjGK1voPY

Where is the best place to plant a hollyhock?

Where to plant: Plant in a well-draining area with full sun to partial shade. Due to their height, protect from damaging winds and provide support such as a fence, wall, trellis or stake. Hollyhocks will readily self-seed if left to their own devices, so locate them in an area where this won’t be a nuisance.

What is the best time to plant hollyhock?

When to plant. Pot grown hollyhocks are best planted in spring or autumn, but can be planted at any time, spacing them 60cm (24in) apart. Plug plants, bought in garden centres or online, are best grown on in 10cm (4in) pots to establish a good root system, before planting out into the garden.

Is a hollyhock an annual or perennial?

Hollyhocks are biennial or short-lived perennials. In the first year they put on root and foliage growth and in the second they flower, set seed and then die.

Do hollyhocks like morning or afternoon sun?

They grow just as well in partial or dappled shade as they do in unfiltered sunlight. In fact, shade from afternoon sun can be a great idea to stave off high heat. Hollyhocks prefer 6 hours of direct sunlight per day. Hollyhocks will grow well in partial shade so long as their sunlight needs are met.

How many years do hollyhocks last?

First of all, hollyhocks are a short lived perennial. This means that most varieties will only live two to three years. Their lifespan can be extended some by removing growing hollyhock flowers as soon as they fade.

Are hollyhock roots invasive?

Alcea rosea (Hollyhock) is listed in the Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States. According to the U.S Forest Service, Invasive species have contributed to the decline of 42% of U.S. endangered and threatened species, and for 18% of U.S. endangered or threatened species.

How long do hollyhocks take to grow?

Spring and fall are the best times to start hollyhock (Alcea rosea) from seed. The entire process, from sowing to transplanting seedlings, takes about nine weeks.

Is it too late to plant hollyhocks?

You can plant hollyhocks from seed now, in the late summer, and you may get blooms next summer. Or wait until late winter or early spring and start transplants indoors. Or, you can plant them outside from seed later next spring. If you wait to plant until next year, you’ll most likely have to wait a year for blooms.

Do hollyhocks bloom all summer?

Bloom midsummer-early fall. Hollyhock Flowers: Four inch double flowers borne on wand-like stems. Blooms start near the base of the stem and move upward so that 1-1/2 to 2 feet of each stem is covered with bloom throughout the season.

What do you do with hollyhocks when they finish flowering?

Toward the end of the growing season, when most of the blooms are finished, you can cut down the main stems of your hollyhocks. If you want the plant to continue coming back year after year, you can leave some seed pods on the stalk. These will develop, drop, and contribute to more growth in the coming years.

What can I plant next to hollyhocks?

Hollyhocks will happily grow alongside any plants that match their cultural requirements of full sun and very well-drained soil. Set yarrow, bellflowers and daisies in front of hollyhocks—they’ll never compete because they like dry soil. Tall cactus zinnias, marigolds and sunflowers share hollyhock’s love of sunshine.

Can hollyhocks survive frost?

Hollyhock blooms are likely to survive a frost. Larkspur blooms are likely to survive a frost. Phlox blooms may survive a light frost. Rudbeckia (Black eyed Susan) blooms will survive frost.

Can I plant hollyhocks in shade?

Hollyhocks are not fussy and survive in many spots but do best in soil that has been amended with compost. They do not like dry soil. With adequate moisture and good drainage, hollyhocks can thrive in full sun or partial shade. Try them in a few different spots in your yard and see where they are happiest.

What do hollyhocks look like the first year?

Hollyhocks begin as a low rosette of floppy, slightly fuzzy leaves. The growth is just vegetative in the first year but by the second year the stem begins to form and flowers appear near the beginning of summer. The huge stalks boast numerous flared blooms that last for weeks.

Can hollyhocks handle shade?

Although hollyhocks tolerate light shade, they grow stronger and fuller in full sun. Hollyhocks growing in the shade tend to be weak and spindly with fewer stalks than those growing in full sun. They are also more prone to diseases, especially rust, when grown in the shade.

How often should you water hollyhocks?

Water daily for the first few weeks after planting, and regularly after that, keeping the soil is moist but not waterlogged. Once hollyhocks grow to maturity, they become relatively drought-tolerant, so you can then decrease your watering frequency to two to three times per week for the rest of the growing season.

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How much space do hollyhocks need?

Water well to eliminate air pockets that may form around the roots. Plant Spacing: Eighteen inches apart. If planted in rows, space rows at least 3 feet apart.

Do hollyhocks survive winter?

The plants are biennials and take two years from seed to bloom. Hollyhock in winter die back, but you still need to protect the roots in order to enjoy the impressive flower display in summer.

Growing Hollyhocks: Planting & Caring for Hollyhock Flowers

HOW TO GROW HOLLYHOCKS Planting and caring for this old-fashioned mid-summer bloomer By Linda Hagen; updated 1/18/2022 FREE WEEKLY NEWSLETTER: Plants, Design Ideas, Gardening Solutions & More!

‘Mars Magic’ hollyhock. Photo by: Proven Winners

A classic cottage garden staple, hollyhocks (Alcea rosea) bloom mid-summer with numerous flowers on tall spikes. Many of the most common varieties are biennials, meaning they complete their lifecycle over 2 years. The first year is spent growing foliage and storing energy. In the second year, the stalks shoot up, flowers bloom and seeds form. However, there are also many varieties that behave like short-lived perennials and will flower in their first year when planted early enough in spring or started indoors in winter.

Other than staking and cutting the stalks back after flowering, hollyhocks really don’t require much maintenance, but they do need to be protected from insects and fungal diseases such as rust. Hollyhocks support the lifecycle of painted lady butterflies as a host plant for their caterpillars and also attract other pollinators such as bees and hummingbirds. If you’ve got a cottage garden, it’s just not complete without a few hollyhocks gracing the edges.

On this page: Basics | Planting | Care | Varieties | Gardening with Hollyhocks

On this page:

HOLLYHOCK BASICS

Zones:

3-9

Height/Spread:

6-8 feet tall, 1-2 feet wide

Exposure:

Full sun to part shade

Bloom time:

June-August

Color and characteristics:

The single or double, cup-shaped flowers have little or no stalk and bloom on tall spikes. Hollyhocks come in a wide variety of colors: blue, pink, purple, red, white, yellow and even black. The tall spikes are covered with blooms from top to bottom. Hollyhock leaves are large, coarse and palmate in shape.

Are hollyhocks poisonous?

Hollyhocks aren’t noted as being poisonous when ingested. However, the stems and leaves can cause skin irritation when the small glass-like fibers on them are touched or brushed against.

Are hollyhocks deer resistant?

Hollyhocks are seldom browsed by deer.

HOW TO PLANT HOLLYHOCKS

How and when to plant hollyhock seeds:

Hollyhocks are easily started from seed indoors or out. Seeds can be sown directly outdoors about a week before last frost. Sow at just ¼ inch deep and about 2 feet apart. Hollyhocks have long taproots, so if seeds are started indoors, use tall, individual pots and transplant early to avoid damage. Start indoor seeds about 9 weeks before the last average frost date. Seedlings can be placed outside two to three weeks after the last frost. Also, bear in mind that some are biennials and may not bloom until their second year.

Where to plant:

Plant in a well-draining area with full sun to partial shade. Due to their height, protect from damaging winds and provide support such as a fence, wall, trellis or stake. Hollyhocks will readily self-seed if left to their own devices, so locate them in an area where this won’t be a nuisance. Also, hollyhocks are one of very few plants that can be planted in proximity to black walnut trees because they are tolerant of the chemical juglone that is leached into the soil by the tree.

HOLLYHOCK CARE

Pruning:

Individual hollyhock flowers can be removed when they fade and entire stalks can be cut back to the base after flowering. This will prevent seed heads from forming and reseeding. Although, if you’d like to have seeds set for next spring, leave the flowers and a few stalks until the seeds have dropped. They’ll die back in winter and all stems and leaves should be cut back to the ground to prevent rust disease from overwintering.

Soil:

Provide rich, moist, well-drained soil for hollyhocks.

Amendments and fertilizer:

Hollyhocks can benefit from a light application of fertilizer or compost in the spring.

Watering:

Provide regular water and keep soil moist for starting hollyhocks. However, once well established, they are fairly drought tolerant. Water from below and avoid wetting the foliage, as this can lead to diseased leaves.

Propagation:

Hollyhocks are best, and easiest, grown from seed and they will readily self-seed if flower stalks are left in place.

Diseases and pests:

They are prone to hollyhock rust, a fungal infection that first shows as yellow spots on leaves, then develops into brown or rust colored bumps on the underside of the leaves. Preventing rust is much easier than trying to tame an outbreak. Watering from below, good air circulation and thorough late fall cleanup will go a long way in stopping rust from forming. Any leaves that show signs of rust should be removed from the plant and disposed of to prevent further spread. There are cultivars that have been developed to be more rust resistant, such as Alcea rugosa varieties.

Slugs, snails, spider mites and Japanese beetles can be problematic as well.

Over-wintering:

In areas that get hard freezes, hollyhocks can be grown as annuals, starting seeds in containers and over-wintering indoors. Water sparingly over the winter and gradually reintroduce them outside when the weather begins to warm up.

In other areas where they can be left outside, prune them back to about 6 inches above ground level in the fall. Cover with 4 to 6 inches of straw or mulch over the root zone and base of the plant. In spring, gradually remove in layers to slowly acclimate the roots. Once new growth is emerging, remove all the straw or mulch. Re-cover in case of a spring freeze.

HOLLYHOCK PICTURES

Swipe to view slides Buy Now Photo by: Proven Winners Alcea rosea ‘Blacknight’— Buy now from Proven Winners Zones: 3-9 Height / Spread: 5 to 6 feet tall, 1 to 2 feet wide Exposure: Full sun Bloom time: Mid-summer Color: Purple-black The darkest of the Spotlight series, this almost black hollyhock is a standout in the garden. This variety behaves more like a short-lived perennial than a biennial. Buy Now Photo by: Proven Winners Alcea rosea ‘Mars Magic’— Buy now from Proven Winners Zones: 3-9 Height / Spread: 5 to 6 feet tall, 2 feet wide Exposure: Full sun Bloom Time: Mid-summer Color: Shades of red Another cultivar from the Spotlight series that offers single red flowers. Photo by: Garden World Images Ltd. / Alamy Stock Photo. Alcea rosea ‘Queeny Purple’ Zones: 3-8 Height / Spread: 2 to 3 feet tall and wide Exposure: Full sun Bloom Time: Mid to late summer Color: Deep purple One of the shortest varieties, its 3- to 4-inch, frilly-edged flowers bloom with season-long color. Its compact size makes it perfect for smaller gardens and containers. Will flower the first year if planted in February. Photo by: Garden World Images Ltd. / Alamy Stock Photo. Alcea rosea ‘Chater’s Double’ Zones: 3-8 Height / Spread: 5 to 7 feet tall, 1 to 2 feet wide Exposure: Full sun Bloom Time: Mid to late summer Color: Available in a variety of colors: yellow, pink, purple, red, white and salmon (shown). These tend to be true biennials, blooming in their second year with fluffy double hollyhock flowers. Photo by: Gardeningpix / Alamy Stock Photo. Alcea rosea Indian Spring Mix Zones: 3-7 Height / Spread: 5 to 8 feet tall, 12 to 18 inches wide Exposure: Full sun Bloom Time: Early to mid-summer Color: A mix in various shades of pink and white. Old-fashioned hollyhocks with single or semi-double flowers will bloom the first year if planted early in spring. Cut back after flowering and you may get a second round in the fall. Photo by: aaor2550 / Shutterstock. Alcea rosea Majorette Mix Zones: 5-8 Height / Spread: 2 feet tall and wide Exposure: Full sun Bloom Time: Mid-summer Color: A mix of colors (shades of pink, yellow, orange, red and white) This dwarf variety has a bushy habit and fringed, semi-double flowers. Excellent for front or middle of borders or in containers. This variety will also bloom the first year if planted early enough. Photo by: Walters Gardens, Inc. Alcea rosea ‘Fiesta Time’ Zones: 3-9 Height / Spread: 3 feet tall, 18 to 24 inches wide Exposure: Full sun Bloom Time: Mid-summer Color: Cerise pink A relatively shorter version with double, fringed blossoms that will bloom in the first year. Its shorter stature makes it a good choice for courtyard gardens and containers. Photo by: Walters Gardens, Inc. Alcea rosea Halo Series Cerise Zones: 3-9 Height / Spread: 5 to 6 feet tall, 2 feet wide Exposure: Full sun Bloom Time: Early to mid-summer Color: Bicolor, cerise pink with deep purple center The Halo series blooms with single, bicolor flowers with either lighter or darker centers. Others in the series are candy, blush, and lavender. Photo by: Walters Gardens, Inc. Alcea rosea Halo Series Blush Zones: 3-9 Height / Spread: 5 to 6 feet tall, 2 feet wide Exposure: Full sun Bloom Time: Early to mid-summer Color: White with fuchsia halo and yellow center A bright and colorful addition to a cottage garden or border. Photo by: ArgenLant / Shutterstock. Alcea rugosa Zones: 4-8 Height / Spread: 4 to 9 feet tall, 1 to 2 feet wide Exposure: Full sun Bloom Time: July to August Color: Light yellow with darker center An old garden favorite that originated in Russia, flowers with 4-inch blooms that attract hummingbirds and are edible. Also proven to be more disease-resistant than other species.

GARDENING WITH HOLLYHOCKS

Hollyhocks add drama and height, making an impressive backdrop to shorter perennials.

Attract hummingbirds and butterflies to your garden.

Plant with companions such as dahlia, clematis, Shasta daisy, shrub rose, baby’s breath, black-eyed Susan, phlox, sweet William and climbing roses.

Include denser plants in front of them to hide their sometimes unattractive legs.

Hollyhocks can be tricky to transplant due to their long taproots, so locate them accordingly so they won’t have to be moved.

RELATED:

Ideas for an Enticing Cottage Garden

English Garden Design

How to grow hollyhocks

Choosing a hollyhock

Hollyhocks are fully hardy and flower in the second year after sowing. They are short-lived perennials and available in both single and double flowers. Before choosing which to go for, you might like consider the following:

Have you got a suitable location in the back of a sunny border or along a wall?

If your garden is windy, choose a sheltered spot and stake your plants as they begin to grow

Single flowers are best to attract pollinators like bees and butterflies

Hollyhocks are not long lived so always allow seedlings to grow and keep the best plants and flower colours

Choose colours that will compliment your other border plants

Go to RHS Find a Plant and search for Alcea rosea to browse the photographs and plant descriptions, and find out where to buy them.

RHS guide to assessing your microclimate RHS guide to assessing your microclimate RHS guide to identifying your soil type RHS guide to identifying your soil type

Buying a hollyhock

Hollyhocks are available as seed, small plug plants and young plants in containers up to 2 litres in size.

Seed is widely available all year round in garden centres and online. There is a wide range of single and double flowered-forms, which are sold as mixtures or single colours. This an economical way to add these plants to your garden and the choice is more extensive than when purchasing plants.

Plug plants or young plants are available in spring, although the choice may be limited. You can buy them in garden centres or online.

How to grow hollyhocks

Hollyhocks , Alcea, have long been associated with cottage gardens . Perfect for the back of a border, they grow up to 2m in height. Each stem bears masses of open, bee-friendly flowers measuring up to 10cm in diameter, from July to September. Hollyhocks are biennial or short-lived perennials. In the first year they put on root and foliage growth and in the second they flower, set seed and then die.

Double hollyhocks are stunning but they don’t have the appeal that single varieties have to pollinating bees. If creating a bee-friendly garden stick to single varieties, where you can see the central part of the flowers.

How to grow hollyhocks

Grow hollyhocks in moist but well-drained, light soil in a sunny spot. Taller varieties may need staking. Let seeds develop after flowering before removing and composting the plants, so you can sow seeds of the following year’s hollyhocks without paying a penny for them.

More on growing hollyhocks:

Take a look at our handy hollyhock grow guide, below.

Where to plant hollyhocks

Hollyhocks do best in a south- or west-facing position in moist but well-drained soil. Chalky, sandy or loamy soils are ideal. Plant them at the back of a border as they can reach heights of 2m or more.

Hollyhocks aren’t suitable for growing in pots.

How to plant hollyhocks

Prepare the soil by removing weeds and digging in plenty of well-rotted organic matter. Plant hollyhocks in the ground, firming gently, and water well. Tie them to a stake such as a bamboo cane, in exposed or windy gardens.

Hollyhocks self-seed readily – these seedling can be lifted carefully and replanted in your desired position, to flower the following year.

How to propagate hollyhocks

Hollyhocks are easy to grow from seed in spring. Prepare a seed tray with peat-free seed compost and water well, allowing the water to drain. The seeds are large enough to space evenly on the compost surface. Place them about 1.5cm apart from the next. Sieve seed compost over the seeds. Ideally place the tray in a propagator set at about 15-20°C.

In about 2 weeks you should see signs of germination. It can take a further five weeks before plants are ready to prick out. The plants should be ready to plant out in June but won’t flower until the following year.

Alternatively, sow seed in summer, and plant out in autumn. These plants should flower the following year.

If you are using seeds that you have collected yourself from hollyhocks that have finished flowering, seeds from perennial varieties are best sown straight away, as they need a period of cold to help them germinate. Seeds saved from biennial types are best stored somewhere cool and dry, and sown the following year.

Caring for hollyhocks

Hollyhocks need very little care. Stake flowering plants and water in dry weather. After flowering. cut the flower spike off once the seeds have dispersed.

Discover the three Golden Rules of growing hollyhocks, in this video featuring hollyhock expert, Mary Baker:

Growing hollyhocks: problem solving

Hollyhocks can be susceptible to hollyhock rust. This is easy to spot as the leaves and stems will be covered in orange-brown spots. In extreme cases the plant will die. The first signs of the problem are visible on the undersides of the leaves.

Remove infected leaves as soon as you spot them and burn them. In autumn clear away and destroy any fallen leaves as the fungus will overwinter in the soil.

Hollyhock varieties to grow

Alcea ‘Rosea Nigra’ – deep maroon flowers from June to September. Reaches a height of 2m

Alcea ‘Halo Mixed’ – a mix of white, purple and pink single flowers held on 2m high stems. Flowers from June to July

Alcea ‘Chater’s Double Icicle’ – a pure white double with flowers that resemble puff palls. Flowers from July to September. Reaches a height of 1.5m

Alcea ‘Black Knight’ – nearly black, single flowers anytime from June to September. Reaches a height of 2m

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Do Hollyhocks Need Full Sun?

Hollyhocks are easygoing plants that do like full sun but can grow just as well in partial shade. You will certainly see the best growth results if your hollyhock is grown in full sun, which means providing 6 hours of direct sunlight each day. However, this volume of sunlight is not a necessity for hollyhocks. A bit of dappled shade will be perfectly fine for this beautiful plant.

How Many Hours of Sun Do Hollyhocks Need?

Hollyhocks do best with 6 hours of direct sunlight each day. However, while ample sunlight is good, hollyhocks aren’t fussy. They grow just as well in partial or dappled shade as they do in unfiltered sunlight. In fact, shade from afternoon sun can be a great idea to stave off high heat.

Hollyhocks prefer 6 hours of direct sunlight per day.

Hollyhocks will grow well in partial shade so long as their sunlight needs are met.

Combine proper sunlight with acidic soil, balanced fertilizer, and mulch for great results.

For the most vigorous growth and plenty of blossoms, plant hollyhocks in acidic, well-fertilized soil. Hollyhocks will generally do best when fed with 10-10-10 flower fertilizers. This balanced fertilizer will speed up the germination rate of your hollyhock plants. Be sure to always provide organic mulch for your plants as well to insulate the soil and retain proper moisture.

Can Hollyhocks Grow in Indirect Sunlight?

Mature hollyhock plants do not grow well in indirect sunlight. However, hollyhock seeds can be started indoors and transplanted outside once they’ve reached maturity. This is because hollyhock seeds germinate best under indirect light. This softer, filtered light is less harsh on these delicate buds. Additionally, room temperature is often the ideal temperature for hollyhock seedlings.

Indirect light is ideal for hollyhock seedlings.

Mature hollyhocks do not grow well in indirect light.

Start hollyhock seedling indoors before transplanting them outdoors.

If you are growing a hollyhock indoors, make sure to place it in front of a window that receives at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily. While east and west-facing windows can sometimes provide this, windows on the south side of your home are more suited to indoor hollyhocks.

Can Hollyhocks Grow in Shade?

Hollyhock plants are perfectly fine with a bit of shade as long as it’s not deep shade. Deep shade will result in undersunned plants, which are prone to disease and death. In order to get the best results from your hollyhocks, grow them in garden beds that receive 6 hours of sun. If your hollyhocks are partially shaded for the rest of the day, they’ll still thrive.

Hollyhocks grow well in partial or light shade.

Balance shaded hours with 6 hours of direct sunlight to get the most from your hollyhocks.

Deep shade without adequate hours of direct sunlight will kill hollyhocks.

Light shade will not discourage your hollyhock flowers from blooming. Shade can also be helpful in warding off high heat, which can be deadly to hollyhocks. So. it can be a good idea to provide shade from afternoon sun especially in the summer.

What Happens if Hollyhocks Don’t Get Enough Sun?

Hollyhocks that get too little sun are at risk of catching fungal diseases. The most famous of these is hollyhock rust, which can be identified by its yellow, brown, or orange spots on the underside of leaves. These fungal spores destroy leaf tissue and will kill your hollyhock if left untreated.

Undersunned hollyhocks catch disease far more easily than those with proper sun hours.

Watch out for fungal diseases like hollyhock rust.

By making sure your hollyhocks get enough hours of sunlight, you can prevent these diseased leaves. Adequate sunlight can make the difference between a hollyhock that blooms throughout the summer and one that dies before you ever see a blossom.

Can Hollyhocks Get Too Much Sun?

Hollyhocks won’t suffer from excess sunlight but they can be damaged by too much heat. Hollyhocks are fairly heat tolerant and will survive temperatures up to 90℉ (32℃). However, temperatures higher than that will put your plant at risk of wilting and dying. To avoid this fate, provide light shade in the afternoon to ward off excessive heat.

Hollyhocks cannot get too much sun but exposure to high temperatures can kill them.

Temperatures over 90℉ (32℃) can be deadly to hollyhocks.

Provide light or dappled shade in the afternoon to protect your hollyhocks from extreme heat.

Excessive heat can also evaporate moisture from the soil, which will cause drought conditions for hollyhocks. These plants prefer high soil moisture but don’t like to be soaked. If the soil becomes dry in periods of high heat, increase your watering frequency to prevent your hollyhocks from dying of thirst.

How Much Sun Do Hollyhocks Require?

Hollyhocks do best with 6 hours of sunlight each day but can tolerate some shade. Light shade will be just as fine to a hollyhock even if it’s not the plant’s preference. The main things to remember when sunning your hollyhocks are:

Hollyhocks prefer 6 hours of direct sunlight per day.

These flowers will grow well with partial shade if all their other needs are met.

Partial shade can help protect hollyhocks from extreme heat.

Indirect sunlight is great for germinating seedlings but is insufficient for mature hollyhocks.

Undersunned hollyhocks will catch fungal diseases more easily.

You can’t oversun a hollyhock plant, but heat and dry soil can kill it.

Always be sure to provide as much sun as possible for your hollyhock while keeping an eye on heat changes. These tall plants produce blossoms in a variety of colors. By providing a little sunlight and some afternoon shade, you’ll get to enjoy an abundance of vibrant hollyhocks this summer.

Indian Spring Mix Hollyhock Seeds

Plant Hollyhock Seeds: Sow seeds in 2 in. pots or cell packs, press into soil and lightly cover. Kept at 70-75° F., germination is in 14-28 days. Can direct sow into prepared seed beds in groups of 3-4 seeds, spaced 2-3 ft. apart. Thin to strongest plant.

Grow Hollyhock: Full sun, part sun in hottest climates. Hollyhock plants perform best in fertile soil with regular moisture. Irrigate from below and provide good air circulation. True perennial hollyhocks noted in description. Most are biennials, or short-lived perennials. Many hollyhocks flower the first season when started early. After flowering cut back plants hard, to within a few in. of the ground. Continue to water and fertilize. Plants repeat bloom in late summer and fall. Single flower hollyhocks attract hummingbirds and butterflies. Hollyhock plants will often self sow.

Indian Spring

Growing

Grow in rich, moist soil with good drainage and a neutral pH range of 6.0-7.5. The most important factor is good air circulation, so do not crowd plants or plant too close to structures, hedges, etc… Keep well watered and feed a few times during the growing season. If the flower stalk is cut back immediately after finishing, plants may bloom again. Stake tall plants.

Rust is a leaf disease to which hollyhocks are especially prone. It is worse on older plants and can be kept in check by replacing plants every couple of years.

Indian Spring

(Alcea rosea) These antique hollyhocks provide old fashioned beauty to any country-style garden. The tall stems bear mostly single blossoms in classic hollyhock colors of deep rose, pink, salmon-pink, and white. Grow as a screen at the back of the garden and watch the towering spires of pointed buds slowly unfurl to reveal chalice-shaped flowers — the dancing gowns of flower garden fairies.

(Alcea rosea) These antique hollyhocks provide old fashioned beauty to any country-style garden. The tall stems bear mostly single bl… Read More

BIENNIAL

Summer/fall bloom

Frost hardy

EASIEST TO START DIRECTLY IN THE GARDEN

Plant seeds in full sun in ordinary garden soil in spring after danger of frost is past. Poke seeds into well-worked soil about 1/2 inch deep, 6 to 8 inches apart. Keep moist until seedlings emerge in 7 to 14 days.

TO START EARLY INDOORS

Start seeds indoors about 8 weeks before last expected frost date. Sow two inches apart and 1/2 inch deep in flats or individual containers of seed starting mix. Provide a strong light source and keep mix evenly moist until germination takes place. When seedlings are 3 to 4 inches tall, transplant 12 to 18 inches apart after gradually acclimating to outdoor conditions.

THIN OR TRANSPLANT

Space seedlings 12 to 18 inches apart so plants have ample room to mature.

GROWING NOTES

Indian Spring will bloom the first year from seed if planted early in spring. Planted later, it will bloom the following summer. After blossoms fade, cut off the spent flower stalks just above the ground. Fertilize well and continue to water plants as needed, and roots will push another flush of enchanting flower spires that will open in fall.

Hollyhock Seeds – Indian Spring Mix

Alcea rosea

Seed Type Heirloom

The semi-tall stalks of Indian Spring Hollyhock are filled with single and semi-double blooms in shades of pink. Prolifically blooming, Indian Spring Mix is known to bloom in its first year, which is unusual for Hollyhocks.

Indian Spring Hollyhock Seeds

When to Sow Outside: RECOMMENDED. 1 to 2 weeks after your average last frost date, or 2 months before your average first fall frost date.

When to Start Inside: 6 to 8 weeks before your average last frost date. Roots are sensitive to disturbance; sow in biodegradable pots that can be planted in the ground.

Days to Emerge: 10–14 days

Seed Depth: Press into surface

Seed Spacing: A group of 3 seeds every 24″–36″

Thinning: When 3″ tall, thin to 1 every 24″–36″

Hollyhock Seeds – Hollyhock Alcea Rosea Indian Spring Flower Seed

Hollyhock seed | indian spring

How to grow

How To Grow Hollyhock From Seed: Establishing hollyhock from flower seeds is very rewarding. To get a jump start on the growing season, you can sow the seeds indoors or in the greenhouse 6 – 8 weeks before the last frost date. Use starter trays and quality starter mix and sow the seeds on the surface, pressing them into the soil to make good contact. Keep them consistently moist.

Sowing the flower seed directly outdoors is an option as well. Prepare soil bed, sow the seeds on the surface and dust over them very lightly with loose garden soil. Keep the seeds moist until germination has occurred. Young plants can be transplanted or even moved to other positions in the garden.

How to Grow Indian Spring Hollyhocks From Seed

For striking garden backgrounds, few plants compare to “Indian Spring” hollyhocks (Alcea rosea “Indian Spring”). These perennials grow to more than 5 feet, with the upper third of the stalk covered in pink, white and wine-colored flowers throughout summer. Hollyhocks thrive in sunny areas with wind protection, such as along a fence or wall. Like other hollyhocks, “Indian Spring” can be grown from direct-planted seed in U.S. Department of Agriculture zone 2 to 10.

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사람들이 주제에 대해 자주 검색하는 키워드 In the Garden: ‘Indian Spring’ Hollyhock – Ornamental Cut Flower Gardening

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